Last edited by Fenrishura
Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

6 edition of No-party democracy in Uganda found in the catalog.

No-party democracy in Uganda

myths and realities

  • 252 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Fountain Publishers in Kampala, Uganda .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Uganda,
  • Uganda.
    • Subjects:
    • National Resistance Movement (Uganda),
    • Political parties -- Uganda,
    • One party systems -- Uganda,
    • Democracy -- Uganda,
    • Uganda -- Politics and government -- 1979-

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 146-153) and index.

      Statementedited by Justus Mugaju & J. Oloka-Onyango.
      ContributionsMugaju, Justus., Oloka-Onyango, Joseph.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsJQ2951.A91 N6 2000
      The Physical Object
      Paginationv, 158 p. ;
      Number of Pages158
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL126861M
      ISBN 109970022040
      LC Control Number99502427

      continent. Many states, including Rwanda and Ghana, have supported a similar no-party model of democracy. Although their systems were often considered de facto one-party states, no-party systems are different in theory from their one-party counterparts, and the case of Uganda highlights some of these differences. Uganda is a good example of the. His research interests are in decentralization, democratization and civil society. He is a co-editor (with Julius Kiiza and Lise Rakner) of Electoral Democracy in Uganda: Institutional Processes and Outcomes of the Multiparty Elections () He has also authored several journal articles and book chapters.

      Uganda s democratic structure was a hierarchy of elected resistance committee representatives that emerged through local rallies. Museveni, being from a minority ethnic group, never liked elections. Assessing this aspect of Uganda’s “no party democracy” has been a primary goal in much recent work by political scientists on Uganda including Kasfir (), Carbone (), Ocitti (), Bratton and Lambright (), and Ottemoeller ().

      “ ‘No-Party Democracy’ in Uganda.” Journal of Democracy 9 (April): 49–64 Kashoki, Mubanga E. n.d. “Variety Is the Spice of Life: The Place of Multilingualism in the Concept of One Zambia, One Nation.”. Although Uganda was officially a “no-party democracy” from until the referendum, party affiliations in Uganda trace back to the s and have been viewed as a key determinant of how Ugandans respond on a range of political questions.


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No-party democracy in Uganda Download PDF EPUB FB2

The book entitled No-Party Democracy in Uganda, Myths and Realities, which was published just before the June referendum, goes a long way towards further expanding on the debates around the movement system (National Resistance Movement) or multi-party democracy.

As indicated in the introduction, the book is a collection of essays (eight. The continuation of no-party democracy has been constitutionalised by the Constituent Assembly of Uganda, causing great controversy. The constitution provided for a referendum to be held in the year to enable No-party democracy in Uganda book to revisit the question of political systems and choose between multiparty, no-party and any other form of democracy.

No-party democracy in Uganda. Kampala, Uganda: Fountain Publishers, (OCoLC) Online version: No-party democracy in Uganda. Kampala, Uganda: Fountain Publishers, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Justus. No-party democracy --Building a no-party state in Uganda --The political economy of support for the new regime --Museveni's political trajectory --The movement: a partisan organization in disguise --The state of the old parties in a no-party No-party democracy in Uganda book --The electoral politics of no-partyism --The parliamentary politics of no-partyism --The demise.

Are political parties an essential element of democracy. Or can a no-party system constitute a viable democratic alternative. Giovanni Carbone examines the politics of Museveniʹs Uganda to illustrate the achievements, contradictions, and limitations of participatory politics in the absence of partisan organizations.

At a time when multiparty reforms were sweeping the globe, Uganda opted for a. The book entitled No-Party Democracy in Uganda, Myths and Realities, which was published just before the June referendum, goes a long way towards further expanding on the debates around the movement system (National Resistance Movement) or multi-party democracy.

No-Party Democracy. Ugandan Politics in Comparative Perspective, Giovanni Carbone Article (PDF Available) in Africa Today 56(4) June with 53 Reads. Kasfir, Nelson ().

“Movement’ Democracy, Legitimacy and Power in Uganda.” In Justus Mugaju and Joe Oloka-Onyango (eds), No-Party Democracy in Uganda: Myths. Electoral Democracy in Uganda: Understanding the Institutional Processes and Outcomes of the Multiparty Elections analyses the institutionalisation of democratic practice in the Uganda with reference to the elections.

The focus is on elections as a "test" of the strength and legitimacy of Uganda's political institutions. Carbone's analysis of how a no-party electoral regime actually works (or doesn't) in Uganda fills a gap in both democracy studies and the study of African politics.

This book draws on the Ugandan experience to illustrate the achievements, contradictions, and limitations of a no-party system of elected government. My new book, East Africa after Liberation, examines how these four ‘post-liberation’ governments have tried – and, ultimately, failed – to do this.

Drawing on over interviews conducted with (current and former) political elites across the region betweenit also reflects more broadly on the acute challenges revolutionary.

Book Review - No-Party Democracy in Uganda, Myths and Realities by Senzo NgubaneNo-Party Democracy in Uganda, Myths and Realities - Mugaju, Justus and Oloka-Onyango (eds.) Uganda: Fountain Publishers, ed by Senzo Ngubane, Research Officer, ACCORD.

Buy No-Party Democracy in Uganda. Myths and Realities First Edition, First Printing by Mugaju, Justus, Oloka-Onyango, J., Olukoshi, Adebayo (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Paperback. This book is the first major study in several decades to consider Uganda as a nation, from its precolonial roots to the present day.

Here, Richard J. Reid examines the political, economic, and social history of Uganda, providing a unique and wide-ranging examination of its turbulent and dynamic past for all those studying Uganda's place in African history and African politics.

The debates as to whether multi-party democracy is an ideal type of political system will surely be part and parcel of African discourse for some time to come. One of the countries in Africa that has been engaged in such a debate both at practical, theoretical and political levels is Uganda.

Democracy. Today only a few people in Uganda would admit to thinking that democracy is a bad thing. Nonetheless, the emergence of more than one recognised political grouping and the appearance of multi-party politics, as is the case now in Uganda, is not necessarily the same as democracy.

The Democratic Party (Swahili: Chama cha Kidemokrasia; DP) is a moderate conservative political party in Uganda led by Norbert DP was led by Paul Ssemogerere for 25 years until his retirement in November John Ssebaana Kizito replaced Ssemogerere, and led the party until Februarywhen Norbert Mao was elected party president.

In the general election of 18 Februarythe. Journal of Democracy () Have Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni and his National Resistance Movement (NRM) invented a form of "no-party democracy" more suitable for Africa than. Some reasons for failure of Uganda's no-party democracy.

Ask Question Asked 5 years, 5 months ago. Active 4 years, 5 months ago. Viewed times 2. Uganda tried a non-partisan democratic system in (whereby political parties were constitutionally restricted via a public referendum) and in overwhelmingly voted to overturn this. There is no doubt that multi-party democracy is the new strategy that is been used to promote this “divide and conquer” strategy.

But in the case of Africa, the division is becoming bloodier and much more dangerous. Africans need to wake up to this reality. Qaddafi’s Proposal: A No-Party State Democracy. In the mids, the National Resistance Movement (NRM) established in Uganda what it claimed was a new type of electoral politics, which soon came to be known as ‘movement’ or ‘no-party’ democracy.Princeton University Library One Washington Road Princeton, NJ USA ()   In Uganda it has eroded the minimum political consensus embodied in Uganda’s constitution.

In basic democratic theory we know that modern democratic government, of whatever stripe and tenor, must be anchored on a set of institutions, the .