Last edited by Tagar
Monday, July 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of A guide to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances regulations (Northern Ireland) 1985 found in the catalog.

A guide to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances regulations (Northern Ireland) 1985

A guide to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances regulations (Northern Ireland) 1985

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Published by H.M.S.O. in Belfast .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Text on inside cover.

StatementHealth and Safety Agency for Northern Ireland.
SeriesHealth and Safety booklet -- HSA 25, Health and Safety series booklet -- HSA 25.
ContributionsHealth and Safety Agency for Northern Ireland.
The Physical Object
Pagination44p. :
Number of Pages44
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22122635M
ISBN 100337111219
OCLC/WorldCa59106899

Whether you’re shipping via air, ground or sea, our reliable reference materials keep you in line with the latest DOT, ICAO and IMO regulations. While you are getting the books you need to stay compliant, don’t forget training is mandatory as well.   Hazardous Substances (Classification Packaging and Labelling) Rules, , gives exemption to pharmaceuticaland cosmetic end products available in packages designated for consumer use and to dangerous goods required for the propulsion of the means of transport or the operation of its specialized equipment during transport.

Dangerous goods, abbreviated DG, are substances that when transported are a risk to health, safety, property or the n dangerous goods that pose risks even when not being transported are known as hazardous materials (abbreviated as HAZMAT or hazmat).. Hazardous materials are often subject to chemical teams are personnel specially trained to handle dangerous. Packaging All hazardous materials must be packaged in United Nations Performance Oriented Packaging (UN POP) except when non-specification packaging is authorized by the 49 CFR. All packaging must meet the requirements set out in 49 CFR and a. Packaging that is not in new or “like new” condition will not be accepted. In.

Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS), Revision 3. The revision to the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) built on the existing standard, by requiring chemical manufacturers and importers to follow specific criteria when evaluating the hazardous chemicals and when communicating the hazards through labels and safety data sheets (SDSs). These Regulations prohibit, subject to exceptions, the supply of products containing certain dangerous substances and preparations including carcinogens, mutagens, chlorinated solvents, toxic substances for reproduction, and listed in Schedule 2 to these Regulations. They in part apply to veterinary products. These Regulations implement Community legislation on the approximation of the laws.


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A guide to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances regulations (Northern Ireland) 1985 Download PDF EPUB FB2

Approved regulatory guidance (sixth edition) documenting the general principles as required by the Regulations known as CHIP 4. Addressed to manufacturers, importers and other suppliers with such responsibilities concerning dangerous substances and preparations and closely follows the European Commission's labelling guide (Annex VI to Directive 67//EEC).

This Approved Classification and Labelling Guide is based on Commission Directive /59/EC3 which sets out Annex VI to the Dangerous Substances Directive (67//EEC).4 The purpose of Annex VI is to provide a harmonised basis for the classification and labelling of dangerous substances and preparations in member states.

European Regulation (EC) No / on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures came into force on 20 January in all EU Member States, including the UK. It is known by its abbreviated form, ‘the CLP Regulation’ or just plain ‘CLP’. In most cases, suppliers need to decide on the classification of a substance or is called self-classification.

In some cases, the decision on the classification of substances is taken at the community level to ensure adequate risk management.

Member States, manufacturers, importers and downstream users may propose the classification and labelling of a. Classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances.

Document or Iniciative. Council Directive 67//EEC of 27 June on the approximation of laws, regulations and administrative provisions relating to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances [See amending acts].

SummaryAuthor: Lucas Smith. The general principles of classification and labelling of dangerous substances applies to the methods specified in Regulation (EC) No / and the criteria laid down in Directive 67//EEC on the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances, save where alternative criteria in the Directive are applied.

Approved guide to the classification and labelling of substances and preparations dangerous for supply. 4 It is important to note that there is a difference between hazard (ie the inherent properties of a chemical) the chemical causing harm to people or the environment).

The ASL provides information about the hazards of certain. Classification Packaging and Labelling Classification, Packaging and Labelling (CPL) legislation aims to protect people and the environment from the effects of dangerous chemicals by requiring suppliers to provide information about the dangers and to package them safely.

The suppliers must identify the hazards and classify the chemical accordingly. (3) Paragraph (1) shall not apply to a substance placed on the market in quantities of less than one tonne per annum for any manufacturer which was notified under the European Communities (Dangerous Substances) (Classification, Packaging, Labelling and Notification) Regulations, (S.I.

of ); provided that. 2 Following the introduction of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Actproposals were put forward for a single set of regulations, dealing with the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances and regulating the conveyance of dangerous substances by road in tankers, tank containers and packages.

These Regulations amend the Classification, Packaging and Labelling of Dangerous Substances Regulations (“the principal Regulations”) to give effect with respect to Great Britain to the provisions of the Commission Directive 87//EEC (OJ No.

L,p.1) adapting to technical progress for the eighth time Council Directive 67//EEC (OJ No. L,p.1) (OJ/SEp. Legislation is available in different versions: Latest Available (revised):The latest available updated version of the legislation incorporating changes made by subsequent legislation and applied by our editorial s we have not yet applied to the text, can be.

Packing and Labelling Dangerous Goods for Transport Scope This document is meant to provide guidance to allow for the safe handling, packaging, and labelling of Dangerous Goods, as defined by the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations (TDGR), at Thompson Rivers University (TRU).

The regulations apply when dangerous goods are received. 67//EEC Council Directive of 27 June on the approximation of laws, regulations and administrative provisions relating to the classification, packing and labelling of dangerous substances This directive has been amended seven times. Hazard Labelling & Packaging according to the CLP Regulation Information Sheet Not all substances and mixtures classified and labelled according to the CLP Regulation require classification and labelling under the provisions of the transport of dangerous goods legislation, i.e.

if they are not considered hazardous for transport. Classify, label and package chemical substances in line with the new CLP system and inform your users of the classification.

Label and package mixtures of substances in line with the new CLP system only. How to comply with CLP (Classification, Labelling and Packaging) Regulation. The CLP Regulation applies to a wide range of companies.

IATA's Dangerous Goods Regulation (DGR) helps you classify, mark, pack, label and document dangerous shipments and hazardous materials in compliance with air transport regulations. Additional tools. History Activities at UN level. The Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) was agreed in December by an UN Committee of Experts and formally adopted by UN ECOSOC2 in July The World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg in encouraged countries to implement the new GHS, as soon as possible with a.

Approved Classification and Labelling Guide iii Notice of Approval v Preface vi Introduction 1 Introduction to recent changes to European classification and labelling legislation 1 European Regulation (EC) No / on the Classification, Labelling and Packaging of Substances and Mixtures (the ‘CLP Regulation’) 1.

4 of the Occupational Safety and Health (Classification, Packaging and Labelling of Hazardous Chemicals) Regulations [P.U. (A) ] (hereinafter referred to as “the Regulations”) which stipulates the duty of a supplier of hazardous chemicals to classify each. on the classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures) will affect the following the dangerous substances directive (67//EEC) (DSD) and the dangerous Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods – Model regulations (commonly referred to as the ‘orange book’).

8.Introduction. Aboutworkplaces throughout New Zealand use hazardous substances. The risks they pose are often underestimated. For example, common hazardous substances like commercial cleaning products, paints, adhesives, acids, bases and solvents can cause serious harm if .Classification, labelling and packaging in accordance with the model regulations of the United Nations for the transport of dangerous goods.

The fundamental decision as to whether cargo has to be transported as dangerous good is based on hazard characteristics.